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A police superintendent and his nephew were beaten and robbed of jewellery, cash, cellphones, bottles of alcohol and household appliances by three gun-toting bandits during an early morning home invasion in El Carmen yesterday.

The daring robbery took place around 3.10 am in the peaceful district of El Carmen, a stone’s throw from the Praedial Larceny Unit.

Speaking on the condition of anonymity to Guardian Media, the superintendent, who served the T&T Police Service (TTPS) for 28 years recently moved into his parents’ home at Centeno Road, said the thieves who wore masks gained entry by kicking in the front door.

The superintendent who plays an integral role in one of the TTPS’ seven divisions has arrested and charged several people involved in illegal quarrying in Valencia, Sangre Grande and Wallerfield.

He has spearheaded investigations into murders, shootings, gang warfare, narcotics and arms and ammunition cases.

“I tell you, I bawl like a pig when I see them men come through the door because the first thing I saw was their guns.”

The superintendent was ordered to lie on the living room floor, while his 77-year-old father, 67-year-old mother and 24-year old nephew were shifted to another location in the house.

He said he heard his ailing mother pleading not to be harmed and his nephew who was hog-tied crying out in pain after the intruders kept stamping on his back demanding cash.

His father, he said, tried to attack the bandits with a stick but was stopped.

During the ten-minute home invasion, he said the thieves kept asking for cash.

“They kept saying we hear all you have money…. plenty money. We have three vehicles in the yard and recently built a garage so they probably think we have money.”

After searching through their wallets and ransacking the house, the thieves got a mere $600.

The bandits also found the superintendent’s handcuff which they used to restrain him.

“When I heard one of them cracked their gun…one bullet gone up in the chamber, I started to ask the Lord for forgiveness. I honestly thought they were going to shoot me. Then they started pulling the gold rings off my fingers.”

The rings, he said valued approximately $16,000.

The superintendent said he was eventually identified as a police officer by one ring which contained the TTPS’ insignia of a star.

At this point, he said the thieves ordered that he hand over his TTPS revolver.

“They kept punching me in the face and kicking my ribs for me to surrender my gun. I kept telling them I had none not knowing what would have been their next move. It was really scary especially hearing my mother and nephew praying aloud. They too were panicking.”

Knowing time was against them, the superintendent said the thieves forgot about the gun and started to steal things from inside house.

They removed bottles of alcohol valued $6,000, an electrical fan, two cellphones and a surge protector before escaping in a Nissan AD wagon.

The matter was reported to the Las Lomas Police Station.

Sgt Figaro is conducting investigations.