PSA

Sedition charge against Watson Duke dismissed

The sedition charge against Public Services' Association (PSA) President, Watson Duke, has been dismissed.

Chief Magistrate Maria Busby-Earle-Caddle opted to discharge Duke as he reappeared before her in the Port-of-Spain Magistrate's Court, a short while ago.

State prosecutors had requested that Busby-Earle-Caddle adjourn the case, after a preliminary hearing of the State's appeal over Justice Frank Seepersad's judgement, in which he struck down aspects of the Sedition Act. The hearing is carded for February 3.

Licensing Office remained closed today

The Licensing Office in Port of Spain remained closed today.

According to workers and the union, the sewage problem on the compound was not fixed.

First Vice President of the Public Service Association (PSA), Ian Murray, said workers showed up to work this morning but refused to work because of the open sewer. 

Murray said they expect to meet with the Transport Commissioner on the compound to discuss the issue soon.

On Thursday, staff walked off the compound after raw sewerage was found to be leaking and the toilets stopped working.

Duke doubles down on use of the N-word

Public Service Association President, Watson Duke, has defended his use of a racial slur when calling on members of the public not to support the People's National Movement (PNM) in the upcoming local government election.

Speaking on a morning talk show on Power 102, he only apologised to those who misunderstood what he meant when using the term.

PNM calls Watson Duke’s statements “offensive”

The People's National Movement (PNM) has responded to what it says were the “offensive remarks” made by president of the Public Service Association, Watson Duke.

At a news conference yesterday, Mr Duke urged all public servants who have not received a pay increase since 2013—particularly those who support the ruling People’s National Movement—not to vote in the upcoming Local Government Elections.

Duke tries to "pound" his way into Finance Ministry

PSA Pres­i­dent Wat­son Duke is at this time "pound­ing" out a tune on the glass doors at the Min­istry of Fi­nance as he de­mands to be let in­to the gov­ern­ment of­fice.

Ac­com­pa­nied by a small con­tin­gent of pub­lic ser­vants, Duke and se­nior of­fi­cers at the Pub­lic Ser­vices As­so­ci­a­tion are call­ing for the set­tle­ment of out­stand­ing ar­rears owed to gov­ern­ment work­ers for the pe­ri­od 2014 to 2016.

Duke to give up PSA title

Pres­i­dent of the Pub­lic Ser­vices As­so­ci­a­tion (PSA) Wat­son Duke says he will not con­test next year’s PSA elec­tions.

In­stead, he plans to fo­cus on his ca­reer as a politi­cian which he be­gan in 2016 hav­ing formed the Pro­gres­sive De­mo­c­ra­t­ic Pa­tri­ots (PDP).

His par­ty won two of the 12 con­test­ed seats and he be­came the To­ba­go House of As­sem­bly’s Mi­nor­i­ty Coun­cil Leader on Jan­u­ary 23, 2017. Duke re­vealed his fu­ture plans dur­ing a live Face­book broad­cast on Sun­day.

Duke weighs run in general elections

Pub­lic Ser­vices As­so­ci­a­tion (PSA) pres­i­dent Wat­son Duke is con­sid­er­ing con­test­ing next year's gen­er­al elec­tion.

Duke said so while ad­dress­ing me­dia per­son­nel dur­ing a sym­bol­ic bon­fire at the rooftop of the as­so­ci­a­tion's head­quar­ters at Aber­crom­by Street, Port-of-Spain, on Tues­day.

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