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Lutalo “Brother Resistance” Masimba.

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Tatil Insurance Agency, a member of the ANSA McAL Group, has added to its clientele the Trinbago Unified Calypsonians Organisation.

Tatil signed an agreement with the organisation for a health plan for its staff and the entire membership.

When Guardian Media contacted Tatil, it said it was the first time the insurance company entered into such an agreement as it pertained to the entertainment sector.

The signing fast-forwarded one of Tuco’s incumbent president Lutalo “Brother Resistance” Masimba’s plans he had placed on his checklist to deliver to the organisation, should he retain his presidency in the Tuco’s upcoming election on July 26.

Masimba, who is confident he will be re-elected for a third time, would have to first beat three fellow members—Morel “King Luta” Peters, Rannie “King Soul” Peters and Oliver “Lord Protector” Cromwell, all vying for the position of president.

In a recent release from the organisation it advised the National Carnival Commission’s (NCC), VIP Lounge was the election venue for members who live in Trinidad and the Mt Pleasant/Carnbee Community Centre was the election venue facilitate TUCO’s Tobago members.

Masimba, in a telephone interview, said he was elated about the agreement between Tuco and Tatil. He said the event met a milestone in the history of entertainment in T&T especially for artistes.

“It was something we always wanted. But it became now imperative for our members with the pandemic, that we have to ensure their health and safety,” Masimba said.

A pension plan and Tuco’s’ own radio station are also among the immediate things Masimba intends to ‘ring his bell’ on, should he retains his presidency.

The Mother Earth singer said currently the biggest challenge the organisation was facing was the uncertainty on the road to the recovery of the entertainment and the creative sectors, in light of the pandemic, which forced a halt in the arena, leaving many members in the fraternity on the breadline.

“None of the Government’s announcements have to date addressed the question of the reopening of the entertainment sector. It is a situation of distress for all entertainers especially calypsonians,” Masimba noted.

He said the entertainment sector was not only made up of artistes but thousands of people who make the end product look good and they, too, were now in distress.

However, though Masimba believes the Government should show more concern for the sector as it contributes greatly to the country’s GDP, he promised as an umbrella organisation Tuco would do its own work to ensure its members’ prosperity.

It is with this perspective Masimba resolves, the decisions were made to secure the health plan for members and to work on getting a pension plan and radio license.

He said with the fallouts which came with the pandemic, which hit the entertainment industry hardest, even across the globe, it was realised more than ever the need for such things to be implemented to preserve entertainers during a crisis and generally as this was their careers.

TUCO became an Act of Parliament incorporated in 1998.

The organisation, Masimba noted, would also be navigating its way through the digital world as it pertains to creating a space digitally for the art form to go on and for artistes to profile their work during the pandemic.

“We do not know what will happen going forward with the Carnival situation as well as live performances so we have to explore and organise ourselves to capture our share of the digital space.”